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Cardiff City model moves to County Hall.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After being centre of attention at the football Stadium event, our Cardiff City model is now on temporary display within the County Hall offices in Cardiff Bay. As you can see from the images it’s a much more low-key venue but we’re told it does get a regular stream of visitors, from politicians and potential inward investors right through to police officers from other cities who use the model to help with crowd control planning for visiting football supporters (sadly not from premiership teams this year!). It’s going to be in County Hall for a few more weeks before moving to its permanent venue in the new Library (opposite John Lewis) where it will be open to the general public. Since the stadium event we’ve added a few tweaks and improvements to the model itself and to the interactive element including a new “All lights on” button which lights up all 36 of the model’s lighting zones at the same time.

6.5m x 5.5m model of Cardiff at 1:750 scale

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s a first glimpse of the massive project we’ve been working on for the last 5 months, a 6.5 x 5.5 metre interactive model of Cardiff. We set it up for the first time yesterday at a major launch in the Cardiff City football stadium where it was the centre of attention for over 200 specially invited guests. The model has been designed for use in a permanent marketing suite to promote the city of Cardiff to national and international investors. It is a fully interactive model controlled via a large touchscreen which activates over 30 different lighting zones on the model and at the same time displays relevant information pages on the screen. The touchscreen images are also projected onto a large screen above the model so that the information is visible to all. More information to follow soon.

Interactive update of static model

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Originally built as a static model in spring this year, GSK asked if we could add an interactive element to help the model convey a more detailed representation of their sustainable energy and waste treatment processes. Our solution was to add a touchscreen information panel linked to area specific illumination on the model. This is the second major project we’ve completed for the blue chip pharmaceuticals manufacturer GlaxoSmithKline who demand the very highest standards from all their suppliers and sub contactors. The main aim of this model was to demonstrate how the company harnesses biogases from their waste treatment process to fuel a newly installed Combined Heat & Power facility. On the original static model colour coding of the pipes indicated the different stages of the treatment process. The addition of the interactive touch screen and pulsing lights on the model allowed us to create a much more engaging and informative presentation.

Marketing model for development at Gloucester Cricket Ground


This large model was commissioned as a marketing tool for a prestigious development of high quality apartments at Gloucestershire County Cricket Ground in Bristol. At 1:100 scale the model was almost 2 metres long and certainly made an eye catching centrepiece for the their marketing suite. The model also features internal illumination and external fibre optic uplighters to give it even more impact. This is actually the second model we have made of this development as we actually produced a smaller scale white model last year to help secure planning permission for the project (link below).
 

Four models with interactive lighting features

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

This group of models was commissioned by the Cardiff University School of Engineering for their stand at the Royal Academy of Engineering Summer Soiree. The models were used to highlight the university’s extensive research in the field of geo-engineering (underground engineering), covering areas such as nuclear waste containment, ground source heating and other underground activities. The models represent cut-away views of the earth’s strata, using different coloured LEDs to illustrate the various processes happening in the layers of rock and sediments. The lights, which were activated by labelled buttons on top of the models, had to recreate several different effects, including linear flows, pulsing, slow fades, changing colours, random flashing, and some complex, timed sequences.

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