Interactive update of static model

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Originally built as a static model in spring this year, GSK asked if we could add an interactive element to help the model convey a more detailed representation of their sustainable energy and waste treatment processes. Our solution was to add a touchscreen information panel linked to area specific illumination on the model. This is the second major project we’ve completed for the blue chip pharmaceuticals manufacturer GlaxoSmithKline who demand the very highest standards from all their suppliers and sub contactors. The main aim of this model was to demonstrate how the company harnesses biogases from their waste treatment process to fuel a newly installed Combined Heat & Power facility. On the original static model colour coding of the pipes indicated the different stages of the treatment process. The addition of the interactive touch screen and pulsing lights on the model allowed us to create a much more engaging and informative presentation.

Button controlled model for Northern PowerGrid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CLNR stands for Customer Led Network Revolution, a method of optimizing the power supply network based on immediate reaction to varying customer demands. The purpose of this model was to illustrate Northern Powergrid’s strategies for maximizing the efficiency of their supplies to both domestic and commercial users. The model looks deceptively simple but actually features some complex programming to demonstrate how the network adjusts to the demands of different users at different times of the day, including storing surplus power for later use. The button panel allows the user to set up varying power requirements which are indicated by lights on the model (turning red) and then press further buttons that illustrate how the demands are resolved (turning the lights green) with energy efficient systems and procedures.

Five models reflecting Atkins involvement in the London Olympic Park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Designed and built for Atkins Engineers, this group of five interactive models was commissioned to reflect Atkins' huge involvement in the construction of the London Olympic Park. Each model highlights a particular aspect of the unglamorous but essential engineering work Atkins carried out at the site, from creating an artificial level surface for the equestrian event, to installing fundamental infrastructure such as bridges, water supplies and drainage. One of the models, which incorporates scrolling LED messages and allows the operator to lift a table tennis ball into the air by controlling a fan, conveys how Atkins designed complex climate control systems to "engineer" the air in many of the park's specialist sporting venues. The models were used initially at an exhibition event linked with the start of the Olympics but will subsequently be displayed in the reception areas of Atkins' main offices around the UK. There is also a plan to export one of the models to the Middle East. .

Contoured model with interactive back projection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We designed and built this topographical model for display at a Royal Academy of Engineering exhibition. The model had to incorporate an acrylic “sea level” panel suitable for back-projection of computer modelled animations showing currents, tidal flows, sediment deposits, etc. It was a technically demanding project because we had to make sure the back projected animation fitted perfectly within the outline of the coast. The vertical scale was exaggerated to accentuate the distinctive character of the South Wales Valleys.

Four models with interactive lighting features

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

This group of models was commissioned by the Cardiff University School of Engineering for their stand at the Royal Academy of Engineering Summer Soiree. The models were used to highlight the university’s extensive research in the field of geo-engineering (underground engineering), covering areas such as nuclear waste containment, ground source heating and other underground activities. The models represent cut-away views of the earth’s strata, using different coloured LEDs to illustrate the various processes happening in the layers of rock and sediments. The lights, which were activated by labelled buttons on top of the models, had to recreate several different effects, including linear flows, pulsing, slow fades, changing colours, random flashing, and some complex, timed sequences.