“Drivetrain” for wind turbine – Scale 1:20











A “Drivetrain”, in case you were wondering, is the component that harnesses the power from the revolving blades of a wind turbine – it’s the machinery the blades are connected to at the top of the tower, normally hidden under a cowling. This particular model was commissioned for use as an eye catching display at trade shows and exhibitions. It was designed to illustrate the flexible, modular nature of the client’s product which could be easily adapted for different types of wind turbine. Taking the real thing along wasn’t really an option due to its massive size and weight. If you click on the images to enlarge them, you’ll see the outline of a standing figure which gives a sense of the machine’s real life dimensions. At 1:20 scale we were able to show a plenty of realistic detail, including individual nuts and bolts and the huge single disc brake with four callipers on the back face of the model.

Five models reflecting Atkins involvement in the London Olympic Park











Designed and built for Atkins Engineers, this group of five interactive models was commissioned to reflect Atkins' huge involvement in the construction of the London Olympic Park. Each model highlights a particular aspect of the unglamorous but essential engineering work Atkins carried out at the site, from creating an artificial level surface for the equestrian event, to installing fundamental infrastructure such as bridges, water supplies and drainage. One of the models, which incorporates scrolling LED messages and allows the operator to lift a table tennis ball into the air by controlling a fan, conveys how Atkins designed complex climate control systems to "engineer" the air in many of the park's specialist sporting venues. The models were used initially at an exhibition event linked with the start of the Olympics but will subsequently be displayed in the reception areas of Atkins' main offices around the UK. There is also a plan to export one of the models to the Middle East. .

Contoured model with interactive back projection











We designed and built this topographical model for display at a Royal Academy of Engineering exhibition. The model had to incorporate an acrylic “sea level” panel suitable for back-projection of computer modelled animations showing currents, tidal flows, sediment deposits, etc. It was a technically demanding project because we had to make sure the back projected animation fitted perfectly within the outline of the coast. The vertical scale was exaggerated to accentuate the distinctive character of the South Wales Valleys.

Interactive model with moving lights and screen interface










After being impressed by the variety and quality of projects on our website, British Sugar came directly to us to design and build this interactive model demonstrating the sophisticated, sustainable manufacturing processes at their main sugar production facility at Wissington. The model design was based on a stylized 2D visual depicting the complex interrelated systems, beneficial by-products and energy efficiency of what is Britain’s biggest sugar beet processing plant. We had to develop this 2D layout into an informative three dimensional display model complete with directional moving lights, illuminated images, and a video presentation with on-screen interface. As you can see from the pictures, the model also had to be eye-catching and attractive with a high quality finish throughout. The client was really pleased with the finished model and informed us they wanted to work with us again in the near future – a sweet result all round!

Life-size Display models for grass protection system.










We’re proud to say that much of our business is from repeat customers and this is one such example. We made a display model for the client last year and they were so pleased with it they came back to us for two more. The company produces grass stabilisation and reinforcement systems and needed some 3D mock ups of how these systems worked to take to trade shows and exhibitions. The first one proved so useful they were delighted to order these new models for use at this year’s shows. All the models were designed to break down for easy transportation.